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Badges? We don’t need no stinkin’ badges! Or do we?

We always appreciate all the hard work spent transcribing records on Notes from Nature, and we want to celebrate your accomplishments. As you gain expertise on Notes from Nature, you earn badges that are added to your “Transcriber’s Life” page (if you have a Zooniverse account — its so easy to get one, and totally worth the 20 seconds it takes to have it).

When we launched Notes from Nature, we had badges for SERNEC and Calbug. Since some you might not know all the badges available, and since, right now, we only show three on each “collection page”, I wanted to walk you through them all, especially because we just added some new ones! In particular, we added one new badge for SERNEC and CalBug, and three new badges for our Macrofungi project.

Here are the original 5 SERNEC Badges (representing seed, sprouts and young tree), earned when you transcribe 1,10,25,75,and 250 records.
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Now you can earn a “mature tree badge” for 1000 records transcribed.

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Here are the three original Calbug badges (egg, catepillar, and butterfly), earned when you transcribe 1,25, and 100 records.

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Now you can also get the “butterfly swarm badge” when you transcribe 500 records.

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And introducing the new Macrofungi badges (spore, mycelium, and mushroom) for transcribing 1,25,and 100 records! Sweet!

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We hope you want to earn all 13. I guess we do like and need those badges, and we hope you do too.

Macrofungi Added to Notes from Nature!

The Notes from Nature team is excited to announce the addition of content from the Macrofungi Collection Consortium!  This collection is a partnership of 35 institutions across the U.S that collectively will digitize about 1.5 million specimens that have been collected the past 150 years.  Macrofungi are important to humans in many ways – many people like to eat them, but some species are also deadly poisonous.  Macrofungi are also key to the health of our forests – indeed, most forest trees could not survive if their roots did not form a relationship with a macrofungus (called mycorrhizae) that helps tree roots absorb water and minerals from the soil.  Macrofungi are also an important source of food for forest animals and they serve as homes for many soil insects and other small organisms that are also part of a healthy forest ecosystem. Many macrofungi are very beautiful, and are the subject of nature photographers.  Their pigments may be used for dyeing wool or cotton, and for paper-making. Macrofungi are important religious symbols in some cultures.  Recently it has been discovered that macrofungi can play a role in the cleanup of environmental disasters.  Through a process called “mycoremediation” macrofungi are able to break down or remove contaminants such as pesticides and fuel oils.

The Macrofungi Collection comprises mushrooms and related fungi.  After collection, specimens of macrofungi are dried on a vegetable dehydrator or similar type of dryer, and then are placed in a box or packet with a specimen label that gives the name of the fungus, when, where, and and by whom the specimen was collected.  Because macrofungi are often very short-lived, documenting their occurrence with specimens is critically important for knowing which macrofungi grow where.

To help scientists answer the many remaining questions about these foundational organisms, they need access to data from collections.  Our project is to digitize these specimens and make the data available in a standardized, searchable form through the MycoPortal.

Although macrofungi (mushrooms and mushroom-like organisms) are not plants, they are still stored as dried specimens in herbaria.  The dried mushroom (which often looks nothing like the fresh mushroom!) is stored in a box or paper packet and is accompanied by a label that that gives the name of mushroom, where it was collected, when, and by whom.

You can contribute to a better understanding about these environmentally critical organisms by helping to transcribe data from the specimen labels into a structured format.   The folks who are capturing the images of these specimens have already recorded the name of the fungus,  so what we need your help with is transcribing the collection locality and date, as well as the collector’s name and number.

If you want to learn more about macrofungi, there are many sources of information.  Online, Encyclopedia of Life, which is also linked to the macrofungi collections in Notes from Nature, is a reference for images and descriptions of many of these fungi.  Mushroom Observer is a site where citizen scientists and professional mycologists meet to discuss macrofungi of interest.  There are also many clubs around the country where participants go on mushroom collecting trips, host lectures for members and teach the general public about these organisms.  You can learn about clubs in your area through the North American Mycological Association website.

Seeking participants for December hackathon!

iDigBio and Zooniverse’s Notes from Nature Project are pleased to invite you to participate in a hackathon to further enable public participation in online transcription of biodiversity specimen labels.  The event will occur from December 16-20, 2013, at iDigBio in Gainesville, FL, though you may choose to participate in a subset of the days based upon the schedule.   We are especially looking for participation from the most enthusiastic and committed citizen science transcribers!  This is a great opportunity to have a direct influence on expanding this tool in the directions you would like to see it go.

The hackathon will produce new functionality and interoperability for Zooniverse’s Notes from Nature  and similar transcription tools.  There are four areas of development that will be progressively addressed throughout the week.

  1. Linking images registered to the iDigBio Cloud with transcription tools in order to alleviate storage issues.  (Monday)
  2. Transcription QA/QC and the reconciliation of replicate transcriptions.  (Remainder of week)
  3. Integration of OCR into the transcription workflow.  (Remainder of week)
  4. New UI features and novel incentive approaches for public engagement.  (Remainder of week)

There will be opportunities to narrow the focus in each category of activity in a teleconference tentatively scheduled for early in the week of November 25 (and also at the TDWG meeting and the iDigBio Summit, if you are attending either of those events).

If you are interested, please get in touch with Austin Mast (amast@bio.fsu.edu) by Wednesday, Nov 1.  iDigBio has budgeted some funds to support travel costs.

With best regards,

Austin and Rob Guralnick (UC-Boulder), co-organizers

A new milestone!

The Notes from Nature team is proud to report reaching the new milestone of 300,000 transcriptions completed!  This has been made possible by the generous and committed efforts of nearly 4,000 citizen scientists from around the globe.  We look forward to continuing the project and sharing more biological collections with you in the near future.  Thank you citizen scientists!

To continue growing and expanding, we are interested in your feedback.  What excites you the most from Notes from Nature so far?  How would you like to see it evolve?  Leave a comment and let us know!

On the radio!

This morning I had the opportunity to join WTJU’s Robert Packard on the Soundboard program to talk about Notes from Nature.  Click here to listen to the clip! 

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